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南亞SAYA設計機能環保賽衣 讓101垂直馬拉松更舒適

南亞SAYA設計機能環保賽衣 讓101垂直馬拉松更舒適2024台北101垂直馬拉松將於五月舉行!台北101垂直馬拉松(Taipei 101 Run Up)是一場以台北101大樓作為比賽場地的登高賽,91層樓、2046階、高度390公尺的獨特形式馬拉松,自2005年開辦以來就在國際馬拉松界享負盛名。本次賽事被國際登高協會(Towerrunning World Association)列為世界冠軍賽(World Championships 2024),預計將吸引許多國際好手前來共襄盛舉。

2023年的賽事為自疫情封鎖後睽違三年再次舉辦,南亞SAYA贊助使用4個寶特瓶與16g回收布料製成的零浪費的異型斷面快乾纖維馬拉松賽衣,在兼顧綠色環保與穿著舒適的同時,讓跑者能夠盡情挑戰自我極限;今年因預期會有來自各地的好手一同參與,SAYA思考頂尖選手的需求,設計出使用全寶特瓶回收材質搭配特殊蜂巢組織織成的機能賽衣,協助跑者們更上一層樓!

【蜂巢賽衣機能】

此次101垂直馬拉松賽衣採雙層布面織法織出特殊六角結構,賦予賽衣不黏身與吸水保溫的效果。

不黏身:蜂巢六角形邊框突出部分於內面,能有效減少布料在人體排汗後,潮濕衣物直接貼身所造成的不適感。

吸水保溫:吸水原理為將纖維織成有兩層結構的布面,透過內層將汗水傳導至吸水力強的外層(防止水分回流)進行蒸發,形成吸濕排汗的作用。此外,賽衣的蜂巢狀邊框於內面突起不僅可以實現不黏身的效果,同時也能降低水分蒸發時與皮膚接觸的面積,進而減少蒸發所帶走的體溫。

南亞SAYA設計機能環保賽衣 讓101垂直馬拉松更舒適

【每公斤紗線減碳1.73公斤】

此次賽衣採用「SAYA 365」100%聚酯(PET)回收紗線製成。

SAYA 365 系列以使用過的寶特瓶回收再製成高機能性纖維,本次賽衣使用之環保紗線相較原生紗線,每公斤可減少約1.73公斤的碳排放量。我們以環保材質得到相同機能的聚酯纖維,打破過去「回收產品=品質較差」的迷思。

以可持續發展為宗旨,SAYA相信環境保護與產品機能是可以兼顧的,期待我們的堅持能夠創造更永續的未來!

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南亞SAYA 攜手101垂直馬拉松 打造最環保的馬拉松賽衣

 

南亞SAYA 攜手101垂直馬拉松 打造最環保的馬拉松賽衣

2023年,台北101垂直馬拉松睽違三年再次舉辦,台北101垂直馬拉松(Taipei 101 Run Up)是一場以台北101大樓作為比賽場地的登高賽,91層樓、2046階、高度390公尺的獨特形式馬拉松,自2005年開辦以來就在國際馬拉松界享負盛名。
2020年起因應新冠疫情而停辦,終於在2023年取得的健康建築WELL認證的同時,再次盛大舉行,讓跑者在最健康的101大樓裡登向全台最高樓!

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BPA-Clear, a safe Bisphenol A (BPA) solution by Nan Ya Plastics

BPA-Clear, a safe Bisphenol A (BPA) solution by Nan Ya Plastics
What is BPA used for?

Bisphenol A (BPA) was used as a raw material for the manufacture of some legacy polycarbonate (PC) and epoxy resin, such as : plastic container, thermal paper, resin lenses or inner layer coatings of cans, etc.

What are some health concerns of BPA?

BPA can be absorbed and ingested through the skin or mouth, disrupting hormones. It may affect the human reproductive system and cranial nerves, and induce obesity, heart disease or cardiovascular disease.

Why is BPA found in some recycled textile fibers?

Most recycled polyester textiles on the market are made from recycled plastic bottles. When recycled materials are mixed with BPA materials, the final textiles may contain excessive amounts of BPA.

Is there a standard for a safe, low-BPA compliant product ?

California CPAI-65, AFIRM, and latest bluesign RSL recommends a BPA level of under 1 ppm. Nan Ya’s BPA-Clear protocol complies to this accordingly.

How does Nan Ya ensure a safe BPA content in its BPA-Clear line?

Nan Ya delivers the BPA-Clear line by strictly controlling the income stream of our recycled plastics as well as with a proprietary system.

Is BPA-Clear currently available on all of Nan Ya’s recycled fiber products?

BPA-Clear polyester fiber and related products are currently available made-to order. Please contact your fabric or fiber sales representative for more details regarding BPA concerns in your goods.

BPA-Clear, a safe Bisphenol A (BPA) solution by Nan Ya Plastics

南亞 SAYA BPA-Clear 聚酯回收絲 – 低雙酚A(BPA)安心方案

雙酚A的用途?
雙酚A (Bisphenol A, BPA)作為製造聚碳酸酯-PC和環氧樹脂的原料,用於: 大型桶裝水、熱感應紙、樹脂鏡片或罐頭內層環氧樹脂塗料等。

雙酚A對健康的影響為何?
雙酚A可透過皮膚或手口接觸而食入吸收,而干擾荷爾蒙運作,除了對人體 的生殖系統及腦神經影響外,還會造成肥胖、心臟病或心血管疾病等。

紡織品中為何可能含有雙酚A?
市面上聚酯回收紡織品大多由回收廢棄塑料製成。當回收料混雜到有雙酚A 材料時,最終製作出來的紡織品即有可能含有超量雙酚A。

南亞 BPA-Clear 產品是否通過國際雙酚A認證?
加州CPAI-65、AFIRM和最新的bluesign RSL建議BPA水平應 低於1 ppm。南亞的 BPA-Clear 產品皆符合相應要求。

南亞如何確保 BPA-Clear 產品符合「低雙酚A」國際標準?
南亞率先研發出雙酚A去除技術以及嚴格控管回收來源,確保回收紡織品中, 雙酚A含量保證低於1 ppm,並依需求提供相關證明。

南亞目前所有的回收纖維產品皆有提供 BPA-Clear 嗎?
BPA-Clear 聚酯纖維及相關產品目前根據訂單需求生產,請聯繫您的南亞公司營業代表進一步諮詢,以更加了解有關產品中BPA的問題。

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In My Opinion: Recycled polyester supplies are a concern

PLASTICS RECYCLING UPDATE January 19, 2022 – As consumers’ appetite for recycled polyester products grows, the industry is facing an unintended consequence: There may not be enough plastic available for recycling to meet the demand.

New garments made of recycled plastic bottles
New garments made of recycled plastic bottles

Campaigns such as the Recycled Polyester Challenge 2025 have served as catalysts for sweeping changes in the textile industry, inspiring brands to move away from virgin polyester and use recycled fibers. As a result, Textile Exchange estimates 17.1 million metric tons of recycled polyester will be needed to cover the needs of the apparel industry when the usage is increased from the current 14% to 45% in 2025.

In 2017, roughly 47% of all available recycled PET in the United States was used for fiber products, according to the Association of Plastic Recyclers (APR) and NAPCOR’s “Report on Postconsumer PET Container Recycling Activity in 2017.” Food and beverage companies were ranked as the second largest users of RPET, at 21%.

At the same time, the volume of PET bottles available for recycling in the U.S. declined for the first time since 2009. As Wood Mackenzie reports, most of the world’s bottle collection volume comes from a few key markets (in Western Europe and Asia, primarily), and collection rates are not rising enough to keep pace with demand.

If this trend continues, there simply won’t be enough bottles in recycling bins to cover the need for RPET. To address the problem, we need to examine some of the factors at play, from consumer and corporate behavior to fashion industry trends and recycling innovations.

Consumer behavior

We don’t want to resurrect virgin bottle usage. However, we can raise awareness to increase recycled plastic collection percentages, especially in the U.S. The problem is not a lack of bottles to recycle. It’s that not enough consumers are recycling.

The U.S. falls behind on recycling compared with other nations, while being the biggest consumer of them all. Add to that: The current recycling infrastructure and state policies governing recycling influence the amount of PET that enters the pipeline. Outdated technology in some states and municipalities, plus lack of public education, means that consumers don’t know what kinds of plastics can be recycled. Or they try to recycle contaminated plastic, which is rejected by older systems.

The countries that lead the world in recycling, such as Germany and Taiwan, have robust nationwide support for recycling programs, government recycling goals, public awareness campaigns, incentive programs and strict recycling policies for producers.

Business behavior

A few things are happening on the corporate level that are influencing the supply of recycled plastic, for better or worse. First, many large corporations have pledged to eliminate all single-use plastic. This is great news for the environment, but it has an impact on RPET supply. Our hope is that they will continue to offer recycling for customers who bring plastic to their properties.

Second, big beverage brands like PepsiCo and The Coca-Cola Co. are switching to RPET and asking customers to return empty plastic bottles to be remade into new bottles. According to a PepsiCo news release, 11 European markets are moving key Pepsi-branded products to 100% RPET bottles by 2022. In the U.S., the goal is that all Pepsi-branded products will be converted to 100% RPET bottles by 2030. Meanwhile, Coca-Cola has been rolling out bottles made from 100% RPET in North America since early 2021.

It’s believed that these brands are offering bottle recovery programs because it’s more cost effective for them to collect and recycle their own plastic rather than buy RPET from other sources. It’s also a way to guarantee that they have a steady supply of plastic to manufacture new bottles.

Many bottled water companies have also embraced using RPET packaging. Beverage Marketing Corporation reports that, for those bottled water companies that use RPET, the average amount of RPET per container increased from 3.3% to 18.2% between 2008 and 2017.

Learn more in person

End users are strategizing to ensure they have the necessary tonnages of RPET and other recycled resins in the years to come. At the Plastics Recycling Conference outside Washington, D.C. March 7-9, top analysts from ICIS will break down the range of market forces at play in the “How to Square Supply and Demand” session. Register today!

Monitoring cost of raw material

Availability is, of course, also related to cost. In the past, it was much easier to find virgin polyester fibers and pellets than recycled ones. But that trend is shifting. The cost of virgin PET plastic rises with the rise in global oil and petroleum prices.

Trade magazines such as Plastics News have observed that the cost of virgin pellets is starting to catch up to the cost of recycled pellets. Ideally, this means fiber mills may have easier access to recycled materials. In turn, recycled polyester fiber will become more widely available to meet consumer demand. But again, this all depends on a steady stream of consumer-recycled bottles.

Alternative sources of recycled polyester

One source of recycled polyester that hasn’t received enough attention is pre-consumer scraps and overstock, or left-over rolls of fabric. At SAYA, we’ve found that, compared with post-consumer bottles, collecting industrial waste is more effective.

The price is currently higher to process and remove colors and finishes from pre-consumer waste, but we believe it’s a worthwhile investment in the long run. The textile industry has a responsibility to clean up its own mess. Fast fashion trends over the past several years have resulted in more overstock and dead stock than ever before. That’s a lot of material that can be recaptured and recycled, creating a more circular industry. This year, SAYA’s scrap recycling program, Rscuw goes into commercialization stage. We forecast a capacity to recycle 62,500 metric tons of mixed-stream, pre-consumer fiber in 2022 and 117,500 metric tons in 2023. We’re hopeful that this will lead a trend toward more fabric recycling market wide.

In the absence of a nationwide U.S. government push to increase bottle recycling, it’s up to all of us in the industry to find creative solutions to ensure there’s enough RPET to sustain demand in the future.

Mike Shih works with SAYA as a marketing executive. SAYA strives to bring new life to what was once discarded by manufacturing sustainable performance fibers from recycled resources and redefine what’s possible in textile renewal. SAYA is able to push the boundaries of innovation, thanks to its parent company Nan Ya Plastics, a branch of the Formosa Plastics Group and a global leader in performance fibers. Nan Ya is dedicated to continuous innovation to stay ahead of fast-moving market trends and raise the bar of the entire industry.

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Finding Alternative Sources of Recycled Polyester

Recently, we examined a trend regarding the dwindling sources of rPET. Demand for recycled polyester fabric is growing (that’s the good news). Yet, the number of bottles that consumers recycle hasn’t kept pace, especially in the U.S. We looked at a couple of important ways consumers and businesses can help lower barriers and change our behavior around recycling.

But that’s not enough. To really ensure a closed, circular economy when it comes to polyester and recycled plastic, we need to take a closer look at alternate sources. Where is there waste in the fiber industry? And how can we capture and reuse that waste?

Recapturing and Reusing Fabric Waste

One source of recycled polyester that hasn’t received enough attention is pre-consumer scraps, seconds, and deadstock. In the apparel industry, as much as 30 percent of every yard of fabric is wasted. 

Textile Industry cutting scrap accounts for up to 30% of yardage used.
Textile Industry cutting scrap accounts for up to 30% of yardage used.

In addition, fast fashion trends over the past several years have resulted in more overstock and dead stock than ever before. That’s a lot of material that can be recaptured and recycled, creating a more circular industry. 

We believe the textile and apparel industry has a responsibility to clean up the mess. This year, SAYA’s scrap recycling program, Rscuw, enters the commercialization phase. It provides a renewal solution for offcuts and rolls of fabric that don’t make into a finished garment. 

At SAYA we’ve found that, compared to post-consumer bottles, collecting industrial waste is more effective. The price is currently higher to process and remove colors and finishes from pre-consumer waste, but we believe it’s a worthwhile investment in the long run. 

We forecast a capacity to recycle 62,500 tonnes of mixed-stream, pre-consumer fiber in 2022 and 117,500 tonnes in 2023. We’re hopeful that this will lead a trend toward more fabric recycling marketwide. 

Used Apparel Recycling Programs

Another opportunity to capture more polyester for recycling is to institute more clothing recycling programs. The Environmental Protection Agency estimates that as much as 84 percent of clothing and textiles end up in landfills. The Council for Textile Recycling reports that the average U.S. citizen throws away 70 pounds of clothing every year. (The council offers a helpful online tool for consumers to find textile recycling centers near them.)

Finding Alternative Sources of Recycled Polyester
Some brands are offering discounts on new apparel if customers recycle their used items.

Clothing manufacturers could incentivize customers by offering them a discount on new apparel when they recycle their old wardrobe items. Some brands are already doing this with success. But governments and municipalities could also make it easier for citizens to recycle clothing in the same way they recycle their old glass jars and plastic bottles. Curbside pickup or centralized drop-off locations would help.

In the absence of a nationwide U.S. government push to increase recycling, it’s up to all of us in the industry to find creative solutions to ensure there’s enough rPET to sustain demand in the future. 

To find out more about our Rscuw program and other fiber recycling, contact change@sayarenew.com

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Recycled plastic bottles are becoming scarce. You can help.

As consumers’ appetite for recycled polyester products grows, the industry is facing an unintended consequence: There may not be enough recycled plastic bottles available to meet the demand. 

Campaigns such as the Recycled Polyester Challenge 2025 inspired brands to move away from virgin polyester and use recycled fibers. The challenge is to increase recycled polyester usage from the current 14 percent to 45 percent by 2025. As a result, Textile Exchange estimates we’ll need 17.1 million metric tonnes of recycled polyester to cover apparel industry demands.

Baled recycled plastic bottles ready for processing
Baled recycled plastic bottles ready for processing

In 2017, roughly 47 percent of all available recycled PET in the United States went to fiber products, according to the Association of Plastic Recyclers (APR) and NAPCOR’s “Report on Postconsumer PET Container Recycling Activity in 2017.” Food and beverage companies were the second largest users of rPET, at 21 percent. 

Meanwhile, the volume of PET bottles available for recycling in the U.S. declined for the first time since 2009. As Wood Mackenzie reports, most of the world’s bottle collection volume comes from a few key markets (in Western Europe and Asia, primarily), and collection rates are not rising enough to keep pace with demand. 

Recycled plastic bottles are becoming scarce. You can help.
Recycled Bottle Supply vs. Demand – 2020-2030 Forecast

If this trend continues, there simply won’t be enough bottles in recycling bins to cover the need for rPET. 

But, we can help change that. Here are some important ways consumers and businesses can help meet the demand. 

Raising Awareness About Recycled Plastic Bottles

Of course, we don’t want to resurrect virgin bottle usage. However, we can raise awareness to increase recycled plastic collection percentages, especially in the U.S. The problem is not a lack of bottles to recycle. It’s that not enough consumers are recycling.

The U.S. falls behind on recycling compared to other nations, while being the biggest consumer of them all. Add to that: The current recycling infrastructure and state policies governing recycling influence the amount of PET that enters the pipeline. Outdated technology in some states and municipalities, plus lack of public education means that consumers don’t know what kinds of plastics can be recycled. Or, they try to recycle contaminated plastic, which is rejected by older systems. 

The countries that lead the world in recycling, such as Germany and Taiwan, have robust nationwide support for recycling programs, government recycling goals, public awareness campaigns, incentive programs, and strict recycling policies for producers. 

If you want to see an increase in recycling rates near you, talk with your city or county officials or neighborhood association. Find out what’s stopping the flow of bottles to recycling centers. See if there are ways to lower those barriers or incentivize people to recycle more. 

Businesses As Influencers

A few things are happening on the corporate level that are influencing the supply of recycled plastic, for better or worse. First, many large corporations and travel companies have pledged to eliminate all single-use plastic. This is great news for the environment, but has an impact on rPET supply. Our hope is that they will continue to offer recycling for customers who bring plastic to their properties. 

Second, big beverage brands like PepsiCo and Coca-Cola are switching to rPET and asking customers to return empty plastic bottles to be remade into new bottles. In the U.S., the goal is that all Pepsi-branded products will be converted to 100 percent rPET bottles by 2030. Meanwhile, Coca-Cola has been rolling out bottles made from 100 percent recycled PET in North America since early 2021. To influence their customers to recycle, the beverage brands are offering bottle recovery programs. This ensures that they have a steady stream of PET to recycle into new bottles. 

What if more apparel companies and fiber brands offered bottle or fiber recovery programs too? Allowing customers to send in post-consumer PET or donate it at the point of purchase could help the supply problem. Brands could incentivize customers by offering them a discount on new products when they recycle their old plastic and polyester. Some brands are already doing this with success. 

By expanding this and creating a reliable pipeline, we could make the polyester industry more circular, capture bottles and fabrics before they make it to the landfill, and keep the supply flowing strong. To learn more about how you can join us, contact change@sayarenew.com

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How are textiles recycled?

We talk a lot about recycling old plastic bottles into new recycled polyester fabric. But how about textile recycling? How are old or scrap fabrics recycled into new products?

The truth is, waste fabric can be just as harmful to our environment as discarded PET. According to the Council for Textile Recycling, the average American throws away about 70 pounds of clothing and other textiles every year. Furthermore, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates that textile trash makes up almost 6 percent of all municipal solid waste. 

Used clothing ready to be resold or recycled.
Used clothing ready to be resold or recycled.

Yet, we believe textiles and used clothing are not trash. Manufacturers can recycle it into new fiber, keeping it out of landfills and helping to build a more circular economy. But how exactly do textiles get recycled? 

Repurposed Fabric

Almost every type of fabric is reusable. Companies can shred it to use in insulation or puffy jackets or cut it into rags or new garments. Some brands, for example, take old denim and use it to make new denim jeans and jackets. Other outdoor and travel brands use recycled polyester in outerwear, such as winter jackets and sleeping bags. 

Builders now use recycled denim insulation in place of fiberglass. This results in higher efficiency, lower energy bills, and better indoor air quality.
Builders now use recycled denim insulation in place of fiberglass. This results in higher efficiency, lower energy bills, and better indoor air quality.

In addition, some home builders use recycled denim insulation in place of fiberglass. This results in higher efficiency, lower energy bills, and better indoor air quality. However, the process is expensive, as companies must break down the recycled fabric and treat it with anti-mold and anti-flammable products to meet building codes. 

Recycled Fabric

Much like other recyclables including paper and plastic, consumers and brands can donate fabric to recycling centers. There, machines or workers will sort it by material and color. Once sorted, the textiles are melted and pulled into fibers or shredded. Depending on the end use of the yarn, companies may incorporate other fibers to create a textile blend. Then, machines clean the yarn and respin it into fibers or threads that can become a variety of new fabrics. 

Some large cities support donations of old garments. Ask around or contact your local recycling center for more information. In addition, you may find non-profit organizations as well as many global brands, such as Nike and Patagonia that accept old textiles for recycling.

Why Recycle?

As an industry, we’ve convinced most consumers that it’s beneficial to recycle their plastic water bottles and containers. But textile recycling remains a significant challenge. An estimated 100 billion garments are produced annually, worldwide, and their recycling rate is below 15 percent. That means, millions of tons of clothing waste ends up in landfills. If we want to move closer to becoming a zero landfill society, we need to educate the public on the benefits of recycling fabric. 

Scrap polyester fabric ready to be recycled
Scrap polyester fabric ready to be recycled

At SAYA, we’ve found that collecting industrial fabric waste is an important way to help keep fabric out of landfills. Fast fashion trends over the past several years have resulted in more overstock, scraps, and dead stock than ever before. That’s a lot of material that can be recaptured and recycled, creating a more circular industry. 

To learn more about our fabric recycling program, contact change@sayarenew.com

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5 Features You Should Look for in Recycled Fabrics

The number of available features in recycled fabrics has expanded as technology has evolved. In the past several years, consumers have demanded more from their clothing. More comfort. Better stretch. More versatility. The rise in athleisure brands and variety of recycled polyester options is evidence of this trend. 

A nonprofit organization called Textile Exchange tracks how many brands use recycled polyester in their products. In 2018, they challenged several major brands to increase their use of recycled polyester or rPET to meet the growing consumer demand and reduce dependence on fossil fuels. As a result, many of those brands increased their use of recycled polyester by more than 35 percent. Furthermore, the nonprofit has challenged the apparel industry to bring the total percentage of recycled polyester up from 14 percent to 45 percent or 17.1 metric tons by 2025.

Increasing the uptake targets of recycled polyester is a win for everyone. But, of course, not all recycled polyester is created equal. As the market welcomes more recycled fabric options, how do you choose the best recycled polyester for your brand and your customers? 

The following are some key features to look for when you’re shopping for recycled polyester or rPET fabrics.

1) Performance 

One of the features in polyester fabrics is performance under a variety of conditions and over hundreds of wears over time. Polyester is idea for medical scrubs.
One of the features in polyester fabrics is performance under a variety of conditions and over hundreds of wears over time. Polyester is idea for medical scrubs.

Firstly, consider performance. Customers want their recycled polyester fabric to perform under a variety of conditions and settings, from workouts at the gym to lunch with friends and even business meetings in office settings. This means shopping for fabrics and fibers that undergo rigorous testing and refinement and are proven to stand up to hundreds of wears over time.  

2) Vibrant Color

One of the key features in polyester fabrics is the ability to use vibrant colors that stay beautiful over time and through hundreds of washings.
One of the key features in polyester fabrics is the ability to use vibrant colors that stay beautiful over time and through hundreds of washings.

One of the ways to reduce our environmental impact is to create clothing that lasts. That means we need to manufacture recycled fibers that stay vibrant and beautiful over time and through hundreds of washings. Color is one feature that is near and dear to SAYA. Our technology, CHROMUCH advances a new standard in sustainable color design. As a result, we can offer the deepest blacks, richest reds, and the brightest blues. CHROMUCH uses a patented ChromShield™ Technology to provide rich color and superior fade resistance from elements like UV, machine washing, and general wear and tear. Our water-free, eco-colors stay brighter and more vibrant longer.

3) Antibacterial qualities

One of the key features in polyester fabrics can be the addition of antimicrobial treatments which can be infused in the fiber in order to stand up over dozens of washes.
The addition of antimicrobial treatments infused in polyester fiber can stand up over dozens of washes.

Old fashioned polyester was notorious for its stink. But advancements in fiber technology has eliminated that problem entirely. When looking to purchase recycled polyester fabrics, look for those that offer certified antibacterial performance over dozens of washes. They should also be non-irritating to the skin and non-leaching. The best antibacterial treatments are infused into the fiber rather than treated on top of the fabric. To learn more about our FRESH process, contact us. 

4) Durability 

Performance apparel made of recycled plastic with stretch and antibacterial enhancements
Performance apparel made of recycled plastic with stretch and antibacterial enhancements

In addition, the best recycled polyester maintains its shape and strength over time. This means consumers can keep it in circulation much longer, reducing their overall carbon footprint. Durability also means that recycled polyester clothing can be recycled again and again without losing its integrity. The best recycled polyester fibers offer optimal stretch and recovery using recycled fibers (and no rubber). SAYA utilizes a proprietary fiber structure to maximize the stretch ratio and durability while also offering moisture management to keep you cool and dry. 

5) Drape or handfeel 

One of the key features in polyester fabrics is the ability to spin fibers making up the fabric into microfilaments which have great drape and feel soft to the hand.
One of the key features in polyester fabrics is the ability to spin fibers making up the fabric into micro-filaments which have great drape and feel soft to the hand.

Handfeel and drape are a customer’s first impression of a garment. Thus, it’s important to source recycled fabrics that not only look great, but feel great too. This is true for clothing that needs to flatter a variety of bodies. And it’s true for other recycled fabrics too like towels, blankets, and bedsheets. For those products, look for microfiber fabrics that have really fine filaments for the softest feel. 

SAYA is proud to offer the highest quality, most technically advanced recycled polyester available. To learn more about the features in recycled fabrics and fibers, contact change@sayarenew.com

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Recycled Polyester vs Polyester, What’s their difference?

You’ve probably seen “recycled polyester” appear on product tags more often in recent years. Companies can use it in place of virgin polyester in clothing, luggage, outdoor gear, blankets, and so much more. But is it really different or better than virgin polyester? And how?

Plastic bottles are the most common ingredient in recycled polyester
Plastic bottles are the most common ingredient in recycled polyester

From rescuing plastic from the landfill to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, recycled polyester outshines virgin polyester in many ways. Here are just a few key differences:

Environmental Impact

As the saying goes, “one man’s trash is another man’s treasure.” In this case, the trash is tons of discarded plastic bottles. The treasure? A strong, sustainable, high-performance polyester fiber. 

Recycled polyester reduces our reliance on petroleum as a raw material. That means less drilling for oil. Furthermore, it diverts used plastic bottles from landfills and the ocean. Several outdoor and athletic brands advocate for using recycled fiber or rPET because it saves energy throughout the production process — as much as 50%. Using rPET also reduces greenhouse gas emissions by as much as 70 percent, according to many estimates. 

Studies show that textiles composed of recycled PET can be recycled repeatedly without affecting the quality or properties of the fiber. The more brands that choose recycled polyester, the more opportunity to reuse the fiber. This creates a circular system at the industry level, which benefits business, the environment, and consumers.

Versatility

As recycled polyester becomes more widely available, brands are using it in a variety of products. The fiber is well suited for clothing and shoes, because of its durability and sweat-proof qualities. Also, some brands are using it in place of canvas in duffel bags, backpacks and luggage. 

Because of its antibacterial qualities and soft feel, manufacturers are using the fiber for high-performance athletic wear. You can also find recycled microfiber in high-quality bath towels, sheets, and blankets. 

Performance

Recycled polyester is a prime choice for active individuals who want high-performance fabrics. It is known for its moisture-wicking properties and its ability to withstand years of frequent wear and washings. All this without losing its shape, color, or soft feel. In addition, recycled polyester is breathable and lightweight, making it ideal for travel, athletics, or outdoor sports. 

Recycled polyester is a prime choice for active individuals who want high-performance fabrics with moisture-wicking properties and the ability to withstand frequent wear and washings.
Recycled polyester is a prime choice for active individuals who want high-performance fabrics with moisture-wicking properties and the ability to withstand frequent wear and washings.

Best of all, it resists fading over time. SAYA uses a patented technology called ChromShield™  to provide ultra-rich color and superior fade resistance. So our fibers withstand elements like UV from the sun, machine washing and general wear and tear. Our water-free, eco-colors stay brighter and more vibrant longer.
To learn more, contact change@sayarenew.com

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3 Ways to Reduce Our Carbon Footprint Globally

3 Ways to reduce and improve carbon emissions globally

For consumers, brands, and countries looking to reduce their carbon footprint and carbon emissions, look no further than your trash can, donation bin, or closet. Some of the easiest ways to reduce our carbon footprint as a society start simply, with textiles and recycling technology. Here are three examples of simple steps we can take right now. 

1. Reduce Textile Waste

Clothing and textiles are discarded at alarming rates. Fast fashion trends make it easy for consumers to purchase inexpensive clothing. People wear it for a limited time, then throw it away or place it in a donation bin (which often ends up as landfill waste). 

Discarded clothing is a contributor to our global carbon footprint
Discarded clothing is a contributor to our global carbon footprint

Yet, many customers don’t realize that even before clothing hits store shelves, there is textile waste. Every year between 20 and 40 percent of new yardage becomes wasted fabric. This is due primarily to cutting room scraps at the factory and overstock at the point of purchase. This pre-consumer waste is a challenge for the clothing industry.

Saya recognizes material waste as a valuable resource. The company is working on pilot programs to renew pre-consumer cutting scraps and overstock, in cooperation with key strategic brands. 

Brands and consumers can help reduce textile waste by buying less and focusing on higher quality products that will stay in circulation longer and offer more utility. They can also look for brands that utilize scrap textile in their manufacturing and offer recycled polyester fabric options. 

2. Improve Recycling Technology to Reduce our Carbon Footprint

Another way to reduce our carbon footprint is to offer better recycling options globally. Investments in recycling technology make it possible for recycling centers and manufacturers to accept a wider variety of plastics. In addition, it helps the consumer, because they no longer have to sort plastics by number or exclude certain plastics from the recycling bin. 

Revolution© sorting system improves recycling for rural communities
Revolution© sorting system improves recycling for rural communities

Better technology keeps more plastic out of landfills and away from our oceans. And, ultimately, it helps businesses by providing a higher quantity (and better quality) of recycled plastic that can be renewed into textiles or other products. Advanced recycling technology requires less energy and produces less waste. It also allows plastic to be returned to its molecular level, making it more versatile and strong. 

“Continuous innovation in renewal technologies is important to increase the yield and of the recycled goods collected,” explains Saya’s Director of R&D Jack Chen. “This is the only way we can someday achieve circularity.”

3. Make Recycling More Accessible to Reduce our Carbon Footprint

Finally, recycling technology is only helpful if consumers know about it and can access it. The current recycling rate in the United States is only 29 percent. Compare that to 72 percent in Japan and 48 percent in Europe. How can we lower the barriers and make recycling more accessible in the United States?

Percentage of PET Recycled by world powers, a step toward reducing the global carbon footprint
Percentage of PET Recycled by world powers, a step toward reducing the global carbon footprint

Ease of recycling is the most important influence on customer behavior. Call2Recycle, a battery recycling program, found that simply reducing the distance from the consumer to drop-off sites to under 10 miles significantly increased recycling behavior. The goal is to eventually make it easier for customers to recycle from home. 

Throughout the US, curbside recycling is typically limited to glass, paper, aluminum, and certain types of plastic. Other recyclables, such as batteries, electronics, or textiles require that consumers make a special trip to a drop-off location or recycling center. The solution? Either bring those recycling locations closer to home or motivate people to make the extra effort to transport their hard-to-recycle items elsewhere. 

Educating the public on the benefits of recycling everything, including polyester fabric, is a good motivation, but brands can also make recycling easier for their customers. Offering recycling bins at the point of purchase, for example, will help improve circularity and reduce the consumer (and brand’s) carbon footprint. 

Another idea? Bring advanced recycling technology to more communities around the world so that customers can someday toss any type of plastic or polyester into their curbside bin. 

To learn more, contact change@sayarenew.com